Serving the Corporate Responsibility Profession

Back in April 2009, I was a founding member of the governing board of the Corporate Responsibility Officers Association.  In a short post I wrote at the time I noted my aspiration “that one of the things the CROA will be able to contribute to will be increasing the structure and recognition of the role and in so doing, will enhance the professional standing of practitioners.”  In fact I made such a big thing of this at the governing board meetings that I was asked to set up a new committee of the association to address exactly this. (What I …

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The Competencies Required for Sustainability – Three Perspectives

Last week I proposed that sustainability is analogous to economics.  The thought was triggered during the GreenGov panel that I was moderating. The panel represented the full gamut of professional organizations in the field; Ira Feldman on the board of the International Society of Sustainability Professionals (ISSP), Valerie Patrick on the board of the Association of Climate Change Officers (ACCO),  Teri Yosie has recently completed a collaboration with  Net Impact,  and myself on the board of the Corporate Responsibility Officers Association (CROA).

The ISSP, CROA and NetImpact have all recently taken a look at the competencies required by …

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Building the Corporate Responsibility Profession – Join The Webinar

For the last couple of years I have chaired the professional development committee of the Corporate Responsibility Officers Association.  With colleagues from Cisco, Hess Oil, Boeing, Molson Coors, Crowe Horwath and Harvard (and workshops at CRO conferences to gain a broader input),  we have been trying to make a start at defining what it means to be a corporate responsibility practitioner.

I believe the CR practice is here to stay. We need to forge our own path and stake our claim to our part in the corporate dynamics, alongside the folks who look after the money, the legal requirements, the …

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Guest Post: Poking Holes in the Corporate Responsibility Curriculum

I am going to hold back on my response to Richard’s view of the holes.  Join us at the webinar to hear my response and the response of the panel members.

By Richard Crespin

In preparation for our upcoming webinar on June 1st on “Building the Corporate Responsibility Profession,” (FREE WEBINAR — register today!) I met with Nancy Beer Tobin from the Executive Education Department at Georgetown University’s McDonough Business School.  She asked me to point out the holes in the Corporate Responsibility (CR) curriculum.

Universities, trade associations, and training organizations have jumped into the CR education space …

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Guest Post: A Gaggle of Privacy Concerns -When Truth Conflicts with Loyalty

Originally posted on the CROA blog.

By Richard Crespin


As Kevin Moss mentioned in his earlier post, the CROA’s Professional Development Committee drafted an ethics code and came up with a set of ethical dilemmas to test it.  In this post we layout the overall concept of ethical dilemmas and propose the first dilemma for you — our field testers — to consider.

Ethical Dilemmas:  Four Classics

In his book, How Good People Make Tough Choices, Rushworth Kidder defined an ethical dilemma as a right vs. right choice.  Morals or laws govern right vs. wrong.  We use ethics …

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Corporate Responsibility Officers Need an Ethics Code!

I posted this on the blog of the Corporate Responsibility Officers Association on October 4, 2010

Doctors have an ethics code. PR professionals, accountants, lawyers, ombudsman, engineers and ethics officers all have ethics codes.  In many ways, a well crafted ethics code defines a profession; it gives guidance to its practitioners to support the most taxing judgment calls they will have to make and articulates its defining values to those outside the profession.

Deciding between what is right and wrong can sometimes be difficult. Corporate Responsibility practitioners often have to go further and decide between two rights.  We also have …

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